'The March' - Sci-Fi London 48 Hour Film Challenge 2014 from Josh Fortune on Vimeo.

An animation created for the Sci-Fi London 48 Hour Film Challenge., telling the story a slave forced to march across the desert of the Planet Tarsus.

Title: THE MARCH

Line: The human emotional response to a robot may become increasingly positive and empathic.

Prop: KEYBOARD_ WE SEE A CHARACTER REPLACE A MISSING KEY ON A KEYBOARD

Science: “Augmented reality becomes so good we neglect reality, when the system to fails, the decay is revealed.”

6K DI Diary from Light Iron on Vimeo.

With 6K cameras coming to market, post companies must explore new ways to seamlessly integrate 6K into their pipeline.

Go behind the scenes at Light Iron to see how we performed a 6K digital intermediate for the RED Digital Cinema short “Closed Set”.

Learn more about DI at Light Iron: lightiron.com/digital-intermediate

THE EDITOR from Inside The Edit on Vimeo.

Nobody knows what we do… so, a homage to every editor out there in those dark rooms creating art with moving images.
insidetheedit.com

Direction, Design, Animation – Dave Penn vimeo.com/sxfngrs
Sound Design – James Locke-Hart jameslockehart.com
Script – Paddy Bird

Construct GTC Teaser from Kevin Margo on Vimeo.

CONSTRUCT is a Sci-Fi short film advancing the art of filmmaking, VFX and virtual production.

This teaser was presented as part of a tech demo at Nvidia’s GTC conference March 25, 2014. This is a work in progress intended to illustrate recent advancements in graphics hardware and software capabilities.

CONSTRUCT in its entirety is coming soon…

For more info:
constructfilm.com/
facebook.com/constructfilm
twitter.com/MargoKevin
kevinmargo.com

The Raid 2: Berandal (Deleted Scene: Gang War) from Merantau Films on Vimeo.

This is one of a few deleted scenes taken from the film. Reasons to cut were entirely down to pacing issues. This was probably the hardest for me to cut due to the fact that the production on this scene lasted around 6 days of shooting, it cost us a fuck load to make and it served to escalate the gang war out onto the streets involving people outside of the closed off inter-gang politics.

At the end of the day though, after discussing its worth it took us away from the central theme for a little too long with characters that would only exist in this scene alone.

Whenever I edit a film - every scene feels like a precious moment. “No fucking way can I cut this” is a regular phrase I utter at Aram (one of the producers at XYZ Films who patiently worked with me to get the film to it’s final cut) but his patience was always a virtue and it’s when you make a cut and no longer miss it from the bigger picture a few days down the line that you realise it was the right decision to make.

But I still want you guys to see the chaos and the mayhem we had in store, and so with the release of the film coming in a few days time - here’s a sample of one of the action scenes that simply didn’t make it.

Enjoy.

- Gareth Evans

TCS - Robot Heart: Heart-Shaped Box - Nirvana (covered by Kawehi) from Kawehi on Vimeo.

I’ll be covering songs that Kickstarter backers pledged for - starting with one of my favorite bands - Nirvana. I love everything about this song.

Say WASABI!: facebook.com/iamkawehi
Say WASABI! on Twitter: @iamkawehi

shazam!
k.

Cats in slow motion from Franz Götsch on Vimeo.

produced by video-goetsch.de ; facebook.com/videogoetsch ; Cats, Katzen ; Camera: Photron SA2,

Robocop - GFX/VFX Montage from Mert Kizilay on Vimeo.

We got the oppurtunity to work on this remarkable remake of Robocop with one of my favourite directors José Padilha ( “”Elite Squad”“) and one of my favourite editors Daniel Rezende (City of God). As expected; there are ton of well thought details and differences in the story. One of them is the way of storytelling throughout the Robocop’s point of view graphics. Around 70 shots; some of them literally have no dialogues. This is the part that, we were responsible for (and additional 40 GFX shots, with displays etc…)

Design was a huge part of story telling. They needed to be clean, understandable, simplistic, convincing, sleek. Appeal was important but secondary. He really didn’t want busy stuff in terms of graphics.
So we focused on telling the story, devilering the message, in a short amount of time such as, showing that Robocop can access to Live CCTV cameras all around Detroit, he can simulate environmental information, calculating his tactics and next possible move, checking vitals, emotions, and more. Story takes time in the near future, and José was always pushing things for convincing and believable results. We made a deep research about past, current and future interface design and military equipment.
We were highly influenced by existing applications.

Robocop has this robot side as well as human side. So we tried to make his interface like a fully functioning operating system. In terms of behavior and motion we tried to give the feeling that he is in control, and he is actually operating things on his POV. In terms of look, we didn’t want to go all futuristic and military not to step away from sense of human touch. Because this is not a suit, he is using this interface to interact anytime. This really embraced the emotional and informative moments besides action sequences. This is another reason that Robocop’s POV graphics are looking much more human and sophisticated compared to ED-209s and EM-208s POV.

The basic idea was imagining all the tools and gadgets are surrounding his head. If he wants to activate something it usually comes from sides. He can hide stuff to sides, bottom, top, and bring them in again. Or he can combine any of those with each other. This also helped us to guide viewers eyes to specific elements of story, by focusing on certain items, without loosing everything completely. We tried to show one action at a time, so it’s possible to track his actions and decisions.

We also wanted to keep things as a well thought branding. United and consistent look and feel was important to us. We even hinted Omnicorp’s hectagon shape for certain elements. Not literal but subtle.

We examined the whole story, and we decided to create certain gadgets that Robocop can use, instead of introducing something new everytime. In this way it would be much easier to tell the story to viewers, instead of forcing them to understand what’s going on with the graphics.
So for CCTV database we have a certain layout, whenever he is accessing to database. There’s another layout which presents Live CCTV, simply a vertical strip. Even in real life, with some of the significant interfaces we are used to collect things on the bottom, and see the live streaming on the side. This helps to viewers to recall things easier.

At the end, Robocop was a great journey with extraordinary vision, with a super great team and people, with a lot good experience and great moments.

Client/Director: MGM / José Padilha

Production: yU+co
Design Supervisor, Creative Director: Garson Yu
Lead Designer/Art Director: Mert Kizilay
Lead Designers/Animators: Johnny Wong, Navarro Parker
Designers: Synderela Peng, Etsuko Uji, Ryan Kravetz, Jonathan Ficcadenti
3D Compositing Supervisor: Stevan Del George
Animators: Alex Yoon, Daniel Onassis, Eric Stoiqa
Researcher/Consultant: Refik Anadol

Compositors: Stephen Mitchell, Devin Uzan, Isa Alsup, Tara Turner, Ian Blewitt Joel Ashman
VFX Editor: Chad Sigston
Executive Producer: Carol Wong
VFX Producers: Carey Keeney, Sarah Coatts
VFX Coordinator: Evan Jackson
Compositing Coordinator: Julie Brown

Music for Montage: Two Fingers - Sweden

Titanfall intro sequence from Spov Design + Moving Image on Vimeo.

Opening movie for Respawn/EA’s new Xbox One game, Titanfall.

This cinematic sequence details humankind’s escape to the stars, using footage of space travel, before utilising Spov’s CG and animation skills to visualise Titanfall’s game world - one where ships and people have travelled to the farthest reaches of the universe.

Influenced by footage from NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn, and particularly an edit by Chris Abbas , the sequence blends the stark and minimal realism of space with the preparation of the massive Titan mechs for their planet fall.

Titanfall’s narrative exists in our universe at an indeterminate point in our future. Using a mix of archive materials, CG and VFX Spov have woven together the human and science-fiction elements to create a holistic storytelling piece.